Government Radio Broadcasting – KRMY Radio http://krmyradio.com/ Sat, 14 May 2022 20:30:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://krmyradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-95-120x120.png Government Radio Broadcasting – KRMY Radio http://krmyradio.com/ 32 32 Nova Scotia government fought back against layoffs of Northern Pulp workers https://krmyradio.com/nova-scotia-government-fought-back-against-layoffs-of-northern-pulp-workers/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:43 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/nova-scotia-government-fought-back-against-layoffs-of-northern-pulp-workers/ We will call her Christine. She has spoken out once before and, like those on the other side of the Northern Pulp debate, has become the target of abuse online and in person. On Tuesday, she was surrounded by boxes containing everything she owned and was at risk of going bankrupt. “We are just collateral […]]]>

We will call her Christine.

She has spoken out once before and, like those on the other side of the Northern Pulp debate, has become the target of abuse online and in person.

On Tuesday, she was surrounded by boxes containing everything she owned and was at risk of going bankrupt.

“We are just collateral damage,” Christine said of the 141 laid-off Northern Pulp workers who will not receive the second half of their severance pay.

Last week, lawyers representing the Nova Scotia government argued in a hearing under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act in the Supreme Court of British Columbia that Northern Pulp would not be allowed to use bridge financing to pay the $1.9 million severance package owed to its terminated employees.

“They were the only major party to oppose it,” said Ron Pink of Halifax, a lawyer for Unifor Local 440.

“The monitor, the company, did not object. They were the only ones,” he said.

Even other creditors, like former owner Blue Wolf Capital, and Terrapure Environmental, which owes over $1 million, have not objected to Northern Pulp paying a $15 million loan severance fee. dollars advanced by parent company Paper Excellence Canada and Pacific Harbor North American. Resources to keep it solvent until December 31.

The loss of severance pay cost Christine $16,700.

The province, which owes $85 million and is Northern Pulp’s main secured creditor, also objected to the mill using the bridge financing to continue to top up workers’ pensions or pay bonds. salary continuance of $4.95 million.

“We expect Northern Pulp to do the right thing and pay its employees and pensioners what is due to them,” read a written response received Tuesday from provincial government spokeswoman Sarah Levy MacLeod. .

“The company attempted to subject these costs to the Creditor Protection Proceedings in an improper manner, and the court agreed not to allow them. We are not willing to take more risk as taxpayers have already provided the company with millions of dollars over the years and we are working hard to protect their interests.

The province objected to Northern Pulp being allowed to take out the $50 million loan because of the conditions attached to it. It would have been placed ahead of amounts due to the province and would come in the form of an advance on milestones achieved by 2022.

They included:

  • An environmental permit for the construction of a replacement effluent treatment plant.
  • An agreement with the province to help fund its design and construction.
  • A court ruling or negotiated settlement with the province that pays for lost profits and damages associated with the kraft mill shutdown.

During hearings in which the province and other creditors objected to the loan, it emerged that Paper Excellence had received $70 million from Northern Pulp in the two years before the province’s legislative shutdown. Boat Harbor Effluent Treatment Facility resulting in the mill being shut down.

And that the provincial government was represented at board meetings where decisions were made to withdraw the money.

“There is no principle in law to treat employees’ claims differently from those of other unsecured creditors or, more importantly, secured creditors,” reads the affidavit filed by the province in which it stands. opposed to allowing severance pay.

This was about the province’s only argument with which Justice Shelley Fitzpatrick agreed.

In her decision, she approved the terms of the loan, allowing the company to underwrite an initial amount of $15 million. The company will have to ask him for permission to request more money from the $50 million credit facility.

It also prohibited the use of this money to pay severance pay, amounts owed to non-union employees or to supplement the pension.

Progressive Conservative leader Tim Houston has argued that the provincial government is using laid-off Northern Pulp workers as pawns in its fight for remaining Northern Pulp assets. Since the factory site is a recognized environmental liability, the main asset is 170,000 hectares of wood that the province lent to it in 2010.

“These are people who went to work, did their job and just want to get paid what’s due to them,” Houston said.

“For the province to prevent workers from collecting their wages is simply unacceptable. »

Christine could have retired at 59 with a full pension.

Approaching that age and with a bad back, she won’t be allowed to start collecting it again until she turns 65 and even then it will be $1,000 less a month than he does. would have been otherwise.

She was surrounded by boxes on Tuesday because she had just moved.

To avoid her current situation, she took a job at another Paper Excellence plant in British Columbia.

She had never driven outside of Nova Scotia, but on April 30 she headed west in a convoy of three cars, each carrying a Northern Pulp employee. They weren’t allowed to carpool due to pandemic-related social distancing rules.

A month after she started working there, that factory was shut down.

“All I have left here are minimum wage jobs,” Christine said.

“I’m trying to avoid bankruptcy but I don’t know how.”

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Reformers seek to reverse growth of new ‘debtor’ prisons https://krmyradio.com/reformers-seek-to-reverse-growth-of-new-debtor-prisons/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:42 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/reformers-seek-to-reverse-growth-of-new-debtor-prisons/ In the three decades since the U.S. Supreme Court prohibited imprisoning people for not being able to afford fines, the practice has become fashionable again, giving rise to what critics describe as a new generation of debtors’ prisons. And now comes the backlash. A wave of investigations and lawsuits by civil rights organizations is forcing […]]]>

In the three decades since the U.S. Supreme Court prohibited imprisoning people for not being able to afford fines, the practice has become fashionable again, giving rise to what critics describe as a new generation of debtors’ prisons.

And now comes the backlash.

A wave of investigations and lawsuits by civil rights organizations is forcing local courts to reduce their reliance on fines, fees and surcharges related to traffic tickets and other minor infractions. Officials across the country are slowly rethinking what it means to be poor in the eyes of the justice system — and finding ways to enable indigent people to avoid falling into a cycle of debt and incarceration.

The latest example came in New Orleans on Thursday, where a federal class action lawsuit accused the criminal court of routinely jailing the city’s poorest for falling behind on fines and court costs.

And in the small town of Alexander City, Alabama, home to 15,000 people, the Southern Poverty Law Center filed a federal complaint last week, alleging that the local government and police chief were running “a modern debtors’ prison” in which the poor were ordered to pay their fines by serving time in the municipal jail at the rate of $20 a day.

“We’re definitely at a time where there’s a lot of public interest and outrage about this,” said Sam Brooke, the SPLC’s deputy legal director.

Much of that interest has to do with the response to the shooting last year of an unarmed black man by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. The murder sparked riots and a furious national discussion about inequities in the criminal justice system – including the use of court fines.

A US Department of Justice report commissioned in response to the unrest documented how Ferguson’s strategy to increase municipal revenue through severe repression of minor offenses. The burden fell disproportionately on the city’s poorest citizens, many of whom ended up behind bars, federal investigators found.

Indeed, the report confirmed what many civil rights organizations had been documenting for years.

“It amplified the message and allowed more reform to happen,” Brooke said. “When we go to places and say, ‘It’s not good,’ we get, ‘What do we need to improve it? “Rather than they reject us completely.”

Brooke leads the SPLC’s new Economic Justice Unit, which over the past 18 months has begun targeting municipal courts where the poor say they have been forced into jail for the sole reason of their inability to pay a fine.

Last year, the organization forced Montgomery, Alabama, to adopt new policies to avoid incarcerating people who could not afford to pay traffic tickets. The city has promised to set a clear standard for judges to determine if someone is too poor to pay and avoid sending them to jail for that reason alone.

The New Orleans lawsuit accuses court officials of issuing arrest warrants for unpaid debts by signing judges’ names without even telling the judges. He describes a scheme to pay off the local criminal justice system on the backs of the poor.

Among the plaintiffs is a 21-year-old woman who has a previous robbery conviction and was jailed in May because she could not find $900 to pay court costs.

Even though she was pregnant, according to the lawsuit, she was handcuffed and imprisoned, not allowed to shower for days and did not receive medical attention for two days after she began bleeding from her genitals. .

The court uses a portion of the fees to fund a court expense fund, the lawsuit says. A state audit report in 2012 found that judges used money from this fund to pay for excessive medical bills and hotels at conferences.

Orleans Parish Criminal District Court officials did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The suit was filed by Equal Justice Under Law, a civil rights group. Civil rights organizations are increasingly trying to expose and dismantle what they see as the unlawful incarceration of indigent defendants.

The American Civil Liberties Union, the Brennan Center for Justice and Human Rights Watch have all made this issue a priority, win reforms in Ohio, Washington, Colorado, Georgia and Missouri.

Their work has extended to use of private companies to recover debtswhich is more common in the South, where there is generally resistance to increased government spending.

“At the end of the day, we want to get to a point where it’s not politically acceptable to have debtors’ jail in your local court,” Brooke said.

Some officials bristle at the comparison to debtors’ prisons, saying the link is unfair.

Prisons for debtors — a remnant of an old English legal strategy to scare people into paying – became a feature of early American criminal justice before being abolished in the mid-1800s. Since then, the United States Supreme Court has repeatedly declared it illegal to incarcerate people because they cannot repay a debt. This included a 1983 ruling that courts should question defendants about their ability to pay fines and jail only those who willfully challenged the system.

Courts are expected to use payment alternatives, such as garnishment or community service.

Duane Merrells marches with an upside down flag during a protest for Michael Brown on August 18, 2014.Charlie Riedel/AP

But the decision left a legal gray area that governments have taken advantage as America’s prison population skyrocketed. The trend of imprisoning poor defendants was accelerated by the economic crisis of the early 2000s, when many cash-strapped municipalities looked to their courts, rather than taxpayers, to generate revenue. This in turn led to the growth of private companies that promised to save local governments money by collecting fees from people on probation, many of whom were jailed for inability to pay.

Stories of lives torn apart by such imprisonments became legion, leading to allegations that they violated constitutional rights to due process and equal protection.

The reforms in Ohio took place when the ACLU state chapter briefed Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor in 2013 on indigent defendants imprisoned for non-payment of fines in several local courts. The solution, O’Connor recalled, was simple: create “bench cards” that reminded judges that the law required them to determine whether a person could afford a fine. If they couldn’t, that was no reason to imprison them.

“Which came down to a re-education of the judiciary,” O’Connor said. “And informing them that they were missing a step or two in the process of figuring out how to collect those fines.”

It seems to have worked.

“I haven’t heard from the ACLU about it, so I guess things are going pretty well,” O’Connor said.

But advocates say illegal debt collection practices continue to thrive across the country.

And that’s what the SPLC says they found in Alexander City.

The alleged victims include Amanda Underwood, a 35-year-old mother-of-five and fast-food worker who says since April 2014 she has spent time in city jail twice after she was unable to find the money she owed for driving with a suspended license. She agreed to become a civil party in the lawsuit “because I didn’t think what Alexander City was doing was right”.

The SPLC said Thursday that the city had agreed to suspend, for 60 days, the imprisonment of people because they could not afford to pay fines. The SPLC said it was in settlement talks with the city.

Alexander City’s attorney did not respond to a request for comment and its police chief, named as a defendant in the lawsuit, declined to comment.

Not too long ago, Underwood received another driving suspension ticket – received when she borrowed a friend’s car to buy food for her children. She has a court date scheduled for October 1 and expects to be asked to pay $250, which she knows she won’t get.

But she hopes that by then the SPLC trial will have persuaded the city to change its ways.

“I don’t want this to happen to anyone else — or even me — again,” she said.

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Sri Lanka sells indebted port to Chinese owner https://krmyradio.com/sri-lanka-sells-indebted-port-to-chinese-owner/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:40 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/sri-lanka-sells-indebted-port-to-chinese-owner/ fast news The announcement comes days after the International Monetary Fund approved the release of $251 million to Sri Lanka, the final installment of a three-year loan. Half of the rehabilitation project to build Colombo Financial City, formerly known as Colombo Port City, has been completed as Sri Lanka hopes to turn it into an […]]]>

fast news

The announcement comes days after the International Monetary Fund approved the release of $251 million to Sri Lanka, the final installment of a three-year loan.

Half of the rehabilitation project to build Colombo Financial City, formerly known as Colombo Port City, has been completed as Sri Lanka hopes to turn it into an international financial hub with special laws protecting foreign investment, December 5, 2017. (AFP)

Sri Lanka handed over a deep-water port to a Chinese company on Saturday, in a deal to boost the finances of the cash-strapped island that has raised concerns at home and abroad over to the growing influence of Beijing.

The $1.12 billion deal first announced in July sees a Chinese state-owned company take over the southern port of Hambantota, which straddles the world’s busiest east-west shipping route, on a lease 99 years old.

“With the signing of the agreement today, the Treasury has received $300 million,” Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe said at a ceremony in the capital to mark the handover.

“This is the start of our debt settlement,” Wickremesinghe said.

The loss-making port will now be jointly managed by the state-owned Sri Lanka Port Authority and China Merchants Port Holdings.

Sri Lanka owes China $8 billion that the regime of former President Mahinda Rajapaksa borrowed for its infrastructure development projects, including the port.

The deal has raised concerns at home and abroad, where countries like India and the United States fear that China’s entrenchment in the deep-sea port will give it a military naval advantage in Indian Ocean.

The Sri Lankan parliament on Friday approved sweeping tax concessions for the port deal, including a tax holiday of up to 32 years for the Chinese firm, which opposition parties opposed.

“Please tell this House the details of the very favorable tax advantages you have granted to China under the agreement. What do you get out of it?” Anura Dissanayake, an opposition MP, asked Parliament on Saturday.

Sri Lanka has said it wants to reduce its high external debt with proceeds from the Hambantota port deal and is selling other businesses to boost revenue.

Source: AFP

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Origins, how to fix it, and more https://krmyradio.com/origins-how-to-fix-it-and-more/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:37 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/origins-how-to-fix-it-and-more/ Do you ever get so busy during the day that you lack daylight hours to do the things you really want? Have you ever tried to remedy this by denying yourself sleep to make time for these activities? If the answer is yes, then you have participated in bedtime revenge procrastination, which refers to the […]]]>

Do you ever get so busy during the day that you lack daylight hours to do the things you really want? Have you ever tried to remedy this by denying yourself sleep to make time for these activities?

If the answer is yes, then you have participated in bedtime revenge procrastination, which refers to the hours you spend postponing sleep so you can have a little more time for yourself.

The idea of ​​bedtime procrastination for revenge has garnered social media attention in recent months, likely due to the increased stress and altered schedules associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Approximately 40 percent of adults reported having more trouble sleeping during the pandemic.

But the concept appeared before the pandemic. It is seen as a response to long, stressful working hours that leave little time for personal wants and desires.

The idea is that you “revenge” the daytime hours that kept you busy and choose to take time for yourself at night.

This sleep delay may look a little different for each person and may also depend on what your daytime life looks like.

For a mom of several little ones, maybe the goal is to steal some quiet time, and even if you’re exhausted, you choose to settle in and scroll silently on Instagram.

Maybe your days are very structured and all you want to do is lay on the couch and watch the latest episode of Grey’s Anatomy.

Ramiz Fargo, MD, medical director of the Loma Linda University Sleep Disorders Center, adds that the activities involved in bedtime procrastination for revenge are usually easy things that you like to do. “It could be browsing your phone, watching TV, or catching up on reading.”

Whatever the activity, the end result is delayed sleep.

At its core, bedtime revenge procrastination stems from a lack of free time during the day.

Between work, shopping, cooking, visiting friends, raising children, walking the dog, and all the other essential chores of daily life, many people don’t have much time to do things. for fun or joy.

It is worth noting that to research suggests that those who engage in this behavior want to sleep, despite their actions. This disconnection is known as the intention-behavior gap.

There is a suggested link between bedtime procrastination for revenge, general procrastination, and poor self-regulation.

But the researchers point out that the exact link is unclear. People who tend to procrastinate may be more likely to engage in vengeful bedtime procrastination. On the other hand, it is possible that the loss of sleep due to this phenomenon leads to more general procrastination.

If you strive for regular sleep, think about what else you could avoid in your life. Do you delay paying an invoice or sending an email? How about returning that phone call you ignored for a week? All of these things could be related.

Everyone needs sleep, and not getting enough sleep can lead to problems later on. Missing a night here and there will likely only result in dizziness the next day.

But regularly not getting enough sleep can end up affecting everything from your immune system to your libido. Sleep deprivation is also related at an increased risk of several chronic health conditions, including heart disease and high blood pressure.

Lack of sleep can also interfere with your mental health, increase your risk of depression, and impact your overall decision-making ability.

Many bedtime procrastination tips focus on basic sleep hygiene, such as not exercising too close to bedtime, avoiding screens at night, and going to bed at one o’clock. constant every night.

While developing good sleep hygiene is important for overall health, the root cause of bedtime procrastination is a lack of free time during the day.

Consider these strategies for managing responsibilities without forgetting yourself in the process.

Put rest on your schedule

Fargo recommends “working a designated time into your schedule to take a break.”

It may seem counter-intuitive to build downtime into your schedule, but treat self-care like any other important work task or meeting: if it’s not on the calendar or list things to do, it probably won’t get done.

Set yourself reasonably sized goals

To make sure it’s a habit you can stick to, you need to make your new goal both achievable and realistic.

If you have trouble finding time during the day or are worried about missing deadlines, start small. “Using 10-15 minute breaks to exercise or decompress during the day can make you more productive in the long run,” says Fargo.

Include the things that matter most to you

Fargo says, “Make time for the things and people you value most.”

Even if it’s just calling your brother on the phone on your break or a quick trip to the mailbox and back, focus on what makes you feel good during the day.

You don’t need to have a mental health problem to benefit from seeing a therapist. If you feel overwhelmed more often than not or find it difficult to find the right balance between work and play, talking to a mental health professional can be a big help.

They can help you with things like:

  • learn new relaxation strategies
  • identify specific sources of stress and develop tools to manage them
  • think about potential career changes that could provide a better work-life balance
  • coping with any mental health symptoms you are experiencing due to lack of sleep

You do not know where to start ? Our affordable therapy guide can help.

Occasionally, staying up too late to read, browse social media, or talk to friends is nothing out of the ordinary. But regularly delaying sleep not only leaves you groggy during the day, but also impacts your overall health.

No one “gets used to” little sleep, contrary to popular belief. Depriving your body of what it needs to survive will eventually have consequences. We all have things we miss when we have busy schedules, but finding time to take care of ourselves shouldn’t be on this list. Even if it takes sending a Google Calendar invite to your best friend to make sure they call you at 1 p.m. to trigger a short break, figure out what works for you.


Taneasha White is Black, in love with words, inquisition and community, and has used her role in literary and organizational spaces to make space for people who are often left out. She is the founder and editor-in-chief of UnSung Literary Magazine, a flash publication of fiction and poetry aimed at providing an artistic space for marginalized voices; a guest editor with Quail Bell Magazine; and co-host of the podcast “Criticisms for culturewhere the media is dissected through humor and a sociopolitical lens. You can find more of his work here.

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Holdout Bondholders Join Puerto Rico Sales Tax Debt Restructuring https://krmyradio.com/holdout-bondholders-join-puerto-rico-sales-tax-debt-restructuring/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:37 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/holdout-bondholders-join-puerto-rico-sales-tax-debt-restructuring/ Sep 21 (Reuters) – Two major Puerto Rican bondholders who opposed a deal to restructure revenue bonds from the bankrupt U.S. Commonwealth’s Sales Tax Financing Corporation (COFINA) are now part of the deal, the island’s federally appointed supervisory board announced on Friday. The board said Aurelius Capital Master Ltd and Six PRC Investments LLC, a […]]]>

Sep 21 (Reuters) – Two major Puerto Rican bondholders who opposed a deal to restructure revenue bonds from the bankrupt U.S. Commonwealth’s Sales Tax Financing Corporation (COFINA) are now part of the deal, the island’s federally appointed supervisory board announced on Friday.

The board said Aurelius Capital Master Ltd and Six PRC Investments LLC, a subsidiary of Monarch Alternative Capital, have chosen to back the deal. Both own significant amounts of senior and junior COFINA bonds, but mostly own Puerto Rico general obligation (GO) bonds.

The move ends opposition by the island’s ad hoc group of GO bondholders to a COFINA debt restructuring plan, according to the board. The three-member group, which includes Aurelius and Monarch, opposed a COFINA settlement framework in bankruptcy court in June, calling it illegal. GO and COFINA bondholders have long debated ownership of Puerto Rico’s future sales tax revenue.

Aurelius and Monarch’s claims in a lawsuit filed in federal court in 2016 challenging COFINA’s constitutionality will also be dropped, under the terms of the settlement.

“The Amended and Restated Plan Support Agreement represents the restructuring of nearly 24% of Puerto Rico’s crippling debt and provides the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico with a 32% reduction in COFINA debt and more than $17 billion in ‘savings on debt service’, the supervisory board said. in a report.

The deal is expected to go before a U.S. judge handling Puerto Rico’s bankruptcy case next month, the statement added.

Puerto Rico has been bankrupt since May 2017 and is trying to restructure about $120 billion in debt and pension obligations.

Other parties to the COFINA deal, which would be Puerto Rico’s first debt adjustment plan in the bankruptcy to seek court approval, include bond insurance companies, bond funds municipal and bondholders sold exclusively to Island residents.

Outside of the bankruptcy case, Puerto Rico won overwhelming approval from creditors for a plan to restructure its debt from the government’s Development Bank.

Reporting by Karen Pierog in Chicago and Luis Valentin Ortiz in San Juan Editing by Matthew Lewis

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Inside the radical community near Kent with no modern technology and no one getting paid https://krmyradio.com/inside-the-radical-community-near-kent-with-no-modern-technology-and-no-one-getting-paid/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:36 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/inside-the-radical-community-near-kent-with-no-modern-technology-and-no-one-getting-paid/ Tucked away in a quiet part of East Sussex is a radical Christian community called Bruderhof. There’s no debt, no crime, no homelessness and everyone has a job – but none of them earn a salary. Modern technology like television and computers are avoided and even rejected. Residents don’t even have cell phones, online mirror […]]]>

Tucked away in a quiet part of East Sussex is a radical Christian community called Bruderhof.

There’s no debt, no crime, no homelessness and everyone has a job – but none of them earn a salary.

Modern technology like television and computers are avoided and even rejected.

Residents don’t even have cell phones, online mirror reports.



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Members of the 300-strong Darvell Bruderhof community must seek permission to begin “wooing” someone of the opposite sex, divorces are prohibited, their jobs are chosen for them, and they have no property.

In 2019, a documentary had extraordinary access to the community, which has quietly existed in Britain for almost 50 years and allowed television cameras for the first time.

The show follows a number of members, including a young woman who has left the colony and wonders about her future in the cult that refuses to join mainstream society.

Located ten miles north of Hastings since 1971, the quasi-self-sufficient community (Bruderhof means “brothers’ place” in German) is in a converted tuberculosis sanatorium near the village of Robertsbridge.

The Christian Bruderhof movement is based on common property and was founded in Germany in 1920 by Protestant theologian Eberhard Arnold.

The community was forced to flee in 1937 after refusing to join the Nazi Party, and many members moved to England.

But they left for Paraguay and then North America when members were threatened with internment in 1941, only to return later.

Living as followers of Jesus, members relinquish all possessions, money, and status when they take their vow of commitment.




Everything is provided for them – from groceries to clothing – and members run a farm, orchard, schools and a multi-million pound business that makes children’s toys and furniture.

It is a simple way of life, based on early biblical texts, which is similar to the ways of life of the Amish.

There is a personal cost and sacrifice for residents, with strict rules and restrictions regarding same-sex relationships, divorce, and what members wear.

Women eschew fashions of all kinds, wearing modest clothing, including scarves, long plaid dresses, and loose shirts. The uniform resembles the traditional peasant dress.




Many decisions about residents’ lives are made for them, including where they live and what jobs they do.

The family lives in shared houses with several other families, and most meals are taken with other residents in a large communal dining hall.

Members are frequently moved between the other 23 Bruderhof settlements around the world.

There are only 3,000 members worldwide and the other UK communities are in Nonington, Kent, and Peckham, South London.

“We have another vision of our society”




Community Outreach Director Bernard Hibbs, 38, is featured in the program with his wife Rachel.

He said: “We have a different view of our society.

“We don’t proselytize, it’s unhealthy trying to get people to join.

“But we thought, ‘Why not show people how we live?’ When I leave the community, people are interested in it.

“They worry about their kids and technology, and love the idea of ​​sharing.

“So we’re showing what we’ve learned. It’s not perfect, but if we can encourage people to think about their lifestyle, that’s great.”




Bernard, whose parents joined the community when he was nine years old, added: “These are people living according to the New Testament.

“People who love each other, share their possessions and support each other.”

He dismissed any notion that the Bruderhof is a cult, adding: “People who have never visited us sometimes imagine that we might be a cult.

“But when they come, they find we’re way too normal to qualify – there’s no UFOs, no weird rituals, no secret handshakes.

“People are free to come and go and no one is forced to think a certain way; we disagree on almost everything, from Brexit to how often we should mow the grass.

“We are of course sometimes accused of being a cult, but that’s normal.

“In our experience, if people visit and see for themselves, these concerns are easily answered.”




The program also follows a young woman called Hannah, who wanted an experience outside of Darvell and now lives at a Bruderhof site in New York after living in London.

The 18-year-old will soon begin her university studies to become a teacher before making a lifelong commitment.

She lived alone, got her first paid job, played video games while working with young people at a Christian charity and wore “everything practical”.

She said: “I’ve never really enjoyed staring at a screen all day – personal preference – I find it unproductive and unhealthy.”

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Aging Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station is operating like a newborn https://krmyradio.com/aging-point-lepreau-nuclear-generating-station-is-operating-like-a-newborn/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:36 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/aging-point-lepreau-nuclear-generating-station-is-operating-like-a-newborn/ The 37-year-old Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station in New Brunswick quietly completed a full year of uninterrupted power generation earlier this week, the first since its tween years in the early 1990s. This is a significant development which, if sustained, has the potential to alter NB Power’s financial position. “This achievement, especially through the COVID-19 […]]]>

The 37-year-old Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station in New Brunswick quietly completed a full year of uninterrupted power generation earlier this week, the first since its tween years in the early 1990s.

This is a significant development which, if sustained, has the potential to alter NB Power’s financial position.

“This achievement, especially through the COVID-19 pandemic, is something the station is proud of,” the utility said in a statement about the milestone.

The nuclear plant was shut down for a week last summer for an unexpected repair, but since coming back online on July 15, 2019, it has been running smoothly.

Former Premier Richard Hatfield loved large modern economic development projects and pushed for the adoption of nuclear power in New Brunswick. After years of construction and controversy, Lepreau entered commercial production in 1983. (CBC NEWS)

Over the past year, Lepreau generated nearly 5.8 terawatt hours of electricity for distribution, or about $400 million at market prices, and nearly 100% of its peak capacity.

NB Power believes this is the plant’s longest period of operation without shutdown since at least 1994, and possibly ever, since past records are not readily available.

“It’s a little harder to go further than 26 years (1994),” NB Power spokesman Marc Belliveau said in an email asking if it’s ever been longer.

Lepreau’s year of flawless operation follows hundreds of millions of dollars invested in the plant to address serious performance issues that emerged following its $2.4 billion renovation that s ended in 2012.

It produced only 90% of the electricity expected of it in the first seven and a half years after its refurbishment due to a number of malfunctions in non-nuclear equipment which had no not been upgraded during the nuclear component replacement effort.

$500 million in repairs

Lepreau began what was supposed to be an 18-month, $1.4 billion refurbishment of its nuclear components in 2008. The refurbishment ended three years behind schedule and $1 billion over budget , and the plant has performed below expectations until recently. (Photo submitted)

Multiple unplanned outages caused by malfunctions between 2012 and last July cost NB Power more than $200 million in lost electrical production and drove up the cost of capital repairs and upgrades to improve reliability at Lepreau to over $500 million.

This weighed on NB Power’s financial results and undermined debt repayment plans.

In rate hearings before the Energy and Utilities Board for several years, utility executives predicted that heavy spending at Lepreau would eventually pay off in increased reliability.

NB Power has been unable to repay its multi-billion dollar debt as scheduled since 2013, in part due to generation issues and maintenance costs at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station. (Submitted/NB Power)

It did, and NB Power now expects Lepreau to fuel an increase in profitability.

“If we think about the major factors that have led to below average (financial) performance in recent years, we can highlight Point Lepreau’s performance following the refurbishment,” said Energy’s chief financial officer. NB, Darren Murphy. during hearings in February during Lepreau’s current error-free run.

“Unfortunately, it didn’t perform as we would have liked. However…we were able to significantly improve Point Lepreau’s performance, reducing the risk of Lepreau being the (cause) of a below-average performance.”

Originally, Lepreau was scheduled to be taken offline in April for annual maintenance, but COVID-19 restrictions in the province derailed those plans until September. Instead, it continued to operate and set production records.

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Garysburg man faces drugs, sex offense counts after raid https://krmyradio.com/garysburg-man-faces-drugs-sex-offense-counts-after-raid/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:36 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/garysburg-man-faces-drugs-sex-offense-counts-after-raid/ A Garysburg man this morning was charged with narcotics, sex offense and other charges following the execution of a search warrant. Lt. CA Parker of the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office said the search warrant was executed shortly after 7 a.m. by members of the Down East Drug Task Force, the Garysburg Police Department and with […]]]>

A Garysburg man this morning was charged with narcotics, sex offense and other charges following the execution of a search warrant.

Lt. CA Parker of the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office said the search warrant was executed shortly after 7 a.m. by members of the Down East Drug Task Force, the Garysburg Police Department and with the assistance of the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

The arrest of Dameon Rocky Turner, 35, in the 200 block of Truman Street was based on a joint investigation between the sheriff’s office and the SBI.

Officers located and seized 490 grams of marijuana, promethazine with codeine, a Draco-style AK-47, and a digital scale.

Turner was arrested and charged with criminal possession of marijuana, possession with intent to sell and deliver marijuana, possession of a firearm by a felon, trafficking in opium, possession of paraphernalia drug use, maintaining housing for a controlled substance, lawfully raping a child 15 or younger, and indecent liberties with a child.

Officers determined that Turner allegedly had sex with someone who was 15 or younger at the time of the offense.

He also received three arrest orders – two for driving while the license was revoked and one for keeping a dangerous dog without restraint beyond his property.

He was given $40,000 bond for the drug charges, $50,000 bond for the sex offenses and $500 bond for the arrest orders.

He was given a March 4 court date.

Parker will follow up on the case with the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives and the United States Attorney’s Office.

“The Northampton County Sheriff’s Office will continue to prosecute individuals who commit drug and firearm offenses,” Sheriff Jack Smith said. “I would like to commend and thank the members of the Tri-County Down East Drug Task Force, the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, Sergeant R. Horton and Lieutenant Parker for their efforts in this investigation.”

Says Smith: “We at the Northampton County Sheriff’s Office are committed to removing all illegal drugs from our communities and we will continue to make a difference to make our citizens and neighborhoods safer in the hope that they don’t ‘will not reach our children.”

Citizens are encouraged to report possible drug-related activity by calling the Narcotics Division at 252-534-2611 ext. 175 or the Northampton County Crime Stoppers Sheriff’s Office at 252-534-1110.

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AMC Theaters are looking for lifelines to avoid bankruptcy https://krmyradio.com/amc-theaters-are-looking-for-lifelines-to-avoid-bankruptcy/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:34 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/amc-theaters-are-looking-for-lifelines-to-avoid-bankruptcy/ AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc. needs to raise at least $750 million to stay open and could go bankrupt if the effort isn’t successful. The world’s largest cinema chain said in a filing on Friday that without new funding, existing cash would be exhausted as early as next month. To remain viable through 2021, AMC plans […]]]>

AMC Entertainment Holdings Inc. needs to raise at least $750 million to stay open and could go bankrupt if the effort isn’t successful.

The world’s largest cinema chain said in a filing on Friday that without new funding, existing cash would be exhausted as early as next month. To remain viable through 2021, AMC plans to sell more shares, seek funding from European sources and strike deals with creditors including Mudrick Capital Management.

Current shareholders will likely be wiped out if AMC winds up in bankruptcy, the company said. Its shares fell 5.4% after the disclosure; the stock fell 0.11 cents to US$3.98 at 2:22 p.m. in New York.

Cinema chains have been hit hard during the COVID-19 pandemic by government-mandated closures and then by the reluctance of moviegoers to risk attending. The problem has been compounded by movie studios delaying major releases that would attract more customers.

Little attendance

Traffic to AMC’s U.S. sites fell 92% in the fourth quarter compared to the same period a year ago. The company has limited capacity and hours and has chosen to close some of its US theaters. In major markets such as New York and Los Angeles, movie chains were unable to reopen any locations.

AMC is negotiating rent breaks with its landlords, before more than $400 million in deferred rent comes due next year, and said it needed to reach an agreement to relieve a “substantial part” in order to to avoid bankruptcy.

Cash stood at about $320 million last month, down from $418 million in September, according to the filing. Excluding recent stock offerings, AMC’s average monthly cash burn was about US$125 million in October and November.

AMC has signed a letter of commitment with Mudrick Capital that asks the investment firm to purchase US$100 million of new 15%/17% senior covered toggle bonds due 2026 issued by AMC. In exchange, Mudrick would receive a commitment fee equal to approximately eight million AMC shares. The agreement also provides for the exchange of $100 million of 10%/12% AMC junior subordinated covered PIK bonds due 2026 currently held by Mudrick for approximately 13.7 million shares.

Talks with the lender

The theater chain said it had exchanged term sheets and held due diligence discussions with other parties, and it expects talks to “intensify” in the coming weeks. The negotiations include new fund financing and the conversion of junior debt to equity, which would help reduce AMC’s leverage but dilute current shareholders, the company said.

Senior lenders have also expressed interest in providing a bankruptcy loan, the company said. This debt would rank senior if filed in court. It is seeking an agreement with creditors under its senior facility to extend a waiver.

The movie chain’s lenders have sought to provide financing to AMC if it chooses to file for Chapter 11 court protection, Bloomberg reported in October. A so-called debtor-in-possession loan would allow the company to continue to operate throughout its restructuring.

The group includes investment firms Apollo Global Management Inc., Ares Management Corp., Davidson Kempner Capital Management and Canyon Capital Advisors, according to people familiar with the situation. The bankruptcy loan is being discussed at around US$1 billion, but could change depending on future financial needs and company performance, the sources said.

Company representatives declined to comment or did not immediately provide comment on the situation. They receive advice from lawyers at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher and bankers at Greenhill & Co. The company works with investment bankers at Moelis & Co.

AMC’s ongoing liquidity issues come with few signs that movie theater attendance will recover any time soon. Despite the excitement surrounding the rollout of the vaccines, it will take well into the second quarter of 2021 for a critical mass of moviegoers to be vaccinated – and they may still be reluctant to fill theaters.

The movements of Hollywood production studios are also a bad omen. Warner Bros. from AT&T Inc. shocked the industry last week when it said its 17 major releases slated for 2021 will debut simultaneously on the company’s HBO Max streaming platform and in theaters. AMC responded that it would urgently discuss with WarnerMedia “economic conditions that preserve our business”.

–With the assistance of John J. Edwards III and Rick Green.

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Will pay, says RCom after SC threatens to jail Anil Ambani in Ericsson debt case https://krmyradio.com/will-pay-says-rcom-after-sc-threatens-to-jail-anil-ambani-in-ericsson-debt-case/ Fri, 07 May 2021 04:38:34 +0000 https://krmyradio.com/will-pay-says-rcom-after-sc-threatens-to-jail-anil-ambani-in-ericsson-debt-case/ Trouble for Anil Ambani, the chairman of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, appears to be getting worse, with the Supreme Court ordering him on Wednesday to pay Rs 453 crore to equipment supplier Ericsson within four weeks or face a three day penalty. months in jail. The order cast a shadow over the once flamboyant […]]]>

Trouble for Anil Ambani, the chairman of the Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, appears to be getting worse, with the Supreme Court ordering him on Wednesday to pay Rs 453 crore to equipment supplier Ericsson within four weeks or face a three day penalty. months in jail.

The order cast a shadow over the once flamboyant industrialist who is the younger brother of India’s richest man, Mukesh Ambani.

The Supreme Court’s order in the Reliance Communications (RCom)-Ericsson case will also have political ramifications. The opposition Congress is likely to pose difficult questions to the Modi government on the choice of the jaded industrialist as a partner of French Dassault Aviation, manufacturer of the Rafale fighter jets.

The Rafale deal is already under a political cloud after Congress alleged irregularities in the deal process. Congress also questioned the choice of Indian partner for the deal, saying the Modi government favored Anil’s fledgling defense firm over more experienced state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd. (HAL).

Reliance Communications (RCom), once Anil’s flagship company, had fought an ugly legal battle with its former supplier Ericsson, to whom it owed Rs 550 crore. RCom missed its second deadline to pay it in January this year.

The Rs 550 crore amount was a settlement between the Swedish company and RCom instead of the actual Rs 1,100 crore the latter owed Ericsson as a fee for the “managed services” of its telecommunications network. RCom left the telecommunications sector last year.

Last week, Anil Ambani had to appear personally before the Supreme Court on the contempt motion filed by Ericsson. “Nobody likes losing their business. Unfortunately, RCom has had bad days. I tried to save it but I couldn’t,” lead lawyer Mukul Rohatgi told the Supreme Court, speaking on behalf of his client Anil Ambani.

However, the Supreme Court appeared to show no leniency to the alleged defaulter and has now ordered him and two directors of his company to pay or be jailed.

RCom shares fell 6% on the Bombay Stock Exchange after the announcement. From a peak valuation of Rs 1,65,917 crore in January 2008, RCom’s market capitalization shrunk to just Rs 1,560 crore on February 19, 2019.

In a press release, RCom said: “We respect the judgment of the Supreme Court. RCom Group must comply with the same.”

Paying the money won’t be easy for Anil, however, as his group companies are already up to their necks in debt. The combined debt of his group’s listed companies stood at Rs 1.72 lakh crore in September 2018.

The group had sold assets, and sometimes entire businesses, to reduce its debt. However, a deal with brother Mukesh for the sale of Anil’s telecom assets to the latter’s Reliance Jio for Rs 18,000 crore fell through, after the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) insisted that Jio also accept the arrears. of RCom.

However, Jio didn’t want to do it. Following this, RCom said it is proposing a debt resolution plan with the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) and “expects substantial unsustainable debts and liabilities to be extinguished through the NCLT process. “.

Will Mukesh come to his brother’s aid and help him avoid a prison sentence? That’s what you’ll have to look at now.

RCom sources say the company will be able to pay internal accruals. There have been income tax refunds of around Rs 400 crore, a source said, which could be used to make the payment. Additionally, Rs 118 crore out of the total Rs 550 crore plus interest has already been paid, leaving the debt at Rs 453 crore, the sources added.

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